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It's as if the pianos were haunted. Somewhere about midway through this Tiny Desk, as Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds performed on his electronic keyboard, two upright pianos were playing lilting melodies behind him, absent any performer at the keys. And yet these "ghosts," along with Ólafur's band of strings and percussion, put together some of the most beautiful music I've heard at the Tiny Desk, made all the more mysterious through its presentation.

Icelandic composer Ólafur Arnalds was in a hotel lobby somewhere in Asia when he first saw a modern version of a player piano. This particular one was tapping out The Beatles' "Yesterday."

Nina Cochran, The Berkshire Eagle

It's a fact. 

Most classical music professionals in major symphony orchestras around the country are white, according to the League of American Orchestras.   In this story from NBC news, cellist Nathaniel Taylor reflects on how that reality is affecting his career.

Fringe Fest 7 this fall

Jul 10, 2018

Producers of the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival call it the "Big Reveal," a rundown of the many performers and venues at the annual event, now entering its seventh year.

"Our Fringe will be different from last year because we have so much new talent, so many new ideas. It's going to be fresh, topical and lots of fun," says producer Erica Fee, noting that there are over 500 performances at more than 30 venues in the downtown area.

It's now the largest multi-genre arts festival in the state.

Composer and conductor Oliver Knussen, one of Britain's most influential contemporary classical figures, died Monday at the age of 66. His passing was announced by his publisher, Faber Music, but no cause of death was given.

The Corn Hill Arts Festival is this coming weekend and it marks a milestone. 

It's the 50th year of the event.

Its humble beginning was August 23, 1969. The neighborhood wasn't even known as Corn Hill back then; it was Rochester's Old Third Ward, once one of the city's wealthiest neighborhoods.

In the summer of 1969, it was the target of Urban Renewal efforts. Nine hundred homes had already been demolished.

https://youtu.be/z6yNSIwM1WI

Re-energizing the indomitable Frederick Douglass. That’s what’s happening right now in our community in commemoration of the famed abolitionist’s bicentennial. Two hundred years after his birth, the work done by Douglass in Rochester, both the famous and the lesser-known, remains relevant. Reminders from Douglass that: “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men” continue to challenge us in our schools, churches, and households. On this edition of Need to Know, what it means to celebrate this living legacy in Rochester.

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