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Interested in Steve Jobs, Georgia O'Keefe or Alice in Wonderland? They are all explored in new music in the upcoming American concert season.

Don Hunstein/Warner Classics

Few violinists equal him in charisma and sensitivity. Itzhak Perlman is one of a kind. His rare performances sell out Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, and when he canceled a North Carolina concert earlier this year as a political protest, the ensuing uproar made international headlines. 

On his 71st birthday, take a closer look at his fascinating life in this excellent retrospective from NPR.

Violinist Vilde Frang earns accolades

Aug 30, 2016
https://www.theviolinchannel.com/vilde-frang-gramophone-magazine-concerto-prize/

30 year old VC Artist, Vilde Frang has been awarded the prestigious ‘Concerto Recording of the Year’ accolade by Britain’s Gramophone Magazine.

Listen to her perform

The Glimmerglass Festival, located just North of Cooperstown, NY has announced the appointment of a new Director of its Young Artists Program.

https://www.theviolinchannel.com/finalists-announced-shanghai-violin-competition-2016/

The 6 Finalists have been announced at the 2016 inaugural Shanghai Isaac Stern International Violin Competition – including VC Young Artist Richard Lin.

#1 Ludwig van Beethoven

Aug 28, 2016

Symphony No. 5

Beethoven's 5th Symphony barely made the list five years ago, coming in at #35.  But you spoke loud and clear this year; returning it to the #1 spot.  The familiar four note motif that trumpets its beginning are probably the most well-known four notes in history; even to the classical novice.  This symphony, wrote ETA Hoffman (a contemporary of Beethoven), "sets in motion the machinery of awe, of fear, of terror, of pain, and awakens that infinite yearning which is the essence of romanticism".  http://www.theguardian.com/music/tomserviceblog/2013/sep/16/symphony-guide-beethoven-fifth-tom-service

#2 Ludwig van Beethoven

Aug 28, 2016

Symphony No. 7

Although Beethoven was one of the most recognized composers of his time, he was not always the most popular or beloved.  His 7th symphony however, was welcomed by Viennese audiences at its premiere on December 8, 1813, with Beethoven conducting.  Audiences noted its energy, beauty and hopefulness of a victory over Napoleon.  Dedicated to both Count Moritz von Fries and Russian Empress Elisabeth Aleksiev, it was performed three times in the 10 weeks following its successful premiere.

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#3 Antonín Dvořák

Aug 28, 2016

Symphony No. 9, From the New World

Dvořák's Symphony No. 9, nicknamed From the New World, was written in the 1890s while Dvořák was living and working as the director for the National Conservatory of Music in New York City. The work premiered at Carnegie Hall on December 16, 1893.  As a skilled as seasoned composer and professor at the Prague Conservatory, Dvořák had a great deal of experience and expertise to bring to eager young musicians in the United States, where classical music was just beginning to establish itself. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/220717/New-World-Symphony

#4 Samuel Barber

Aug 28, 2016

Adagio for Strings

The  Adagio for Strings by American composer Samuel Barber, made its debut in 1938 when it was performed on the radio by the NBC Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Arturo Toscanini.  It evolved as an arrangement of the second movement of Barber's String Quartet. The deep emotion of this work, which has been described as passionate, tender, dramatic, powerful, and gentle, has made it popular for use in television, movies and at times of tragedy like the events of 9/11, when American's were searching for comfort and unity.

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#5 Ludwig van Beethoven

Aug 28, 2016

Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 "Choral"

Considered one of the greatest pieces of music ever written, Beethoven's 9th Symphony is one of the most widely heard pieces in the repertoire of classical music. The Symphony is known as the Choral Symphony from the choir and soloists who sing text from the poem "Ode to Joy" by Freiderich Schiller, in the fourth movement. Beethoven's decision to include voices in the Symphony, a traditionally instrumental genre, mark the first time a major composer had ever done so. Perhaps it was this choice that lead to some critics responding poorly to the work's premiere saying that it was "cryptic and eccentric, the product of a deaf and aging composer." However, the reception the Symphony continues to recieve from audiences around the world continues to show the popularity of the work, including your votes placing the 9th at #5 in our 40 for 40. Whatever the reason audiences adore this work, be it the sublime first movement, lively Shcerzo, or joyous fourth movement, Beethoven's Ninth shows no sign of losing its foothold in the canon of classical music.

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