Classical 91.5

Brenda Tremblay

Classical Morning Host and Producer

Brenda Tremblay bolts out of bed every weekday morning at 4:00 a.m. to present classical music on Classical 91.5 FM, streaming at wxxi.org.   (The broadcast starts at 6:00 a.m. with birdsong, inspired by the BBC.)  She’s an NEA Fellow who’s interviewed musical luminaires such as Renée Fleming, Yo-Yo Ma, and Steve Reich.  She also produces and hosts the RPO radio concerts and other local productions, and works with the Center for Public Affairs to create arts and cultural coverage for all media services.  Her productions have earned three Gracies from the Association of Women in Radio and Television, many AP awards, and a national Gabriel Award. 

Away from the studio, Brenda serves as Music Director at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Brockport, New York.  She loves to sing.  She’s performed with choirs in Carnegie Hall, Westminster Abbey, and in the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing.  In Rochester, some of her best musical memories have been made with friends in the Rochester Oratorio Society and Madrigalia.

You are invited to start with the fresh, radiant energy of classical music in new recordings, old favorites, and surprise discoveries with Brenda Tremblay weekdays from six until ten.

This week’s Mystery Pieces are BACKWARDS – and kind of weird.  Tune in at 6:40 a.m. to test yourself.

Tuesday, June 20

Wake with a flock of birds, a flash of pale yellow (Jennifer Higdon), and a double shot of Rochester excellence -- Michael Landrum playing Howard Hanson’s slumber song.

Wednesday, June 21

Accidentally hearing music can melt your heart and ignite your curiosity.  That’s a real possibility on June 21, a day of worldwide celebration of music on which all kinds of musicians – young and old, amateur and professional -- will stream into parks and streets and bridges to make music for the sheer pleasure of it.  Keep your ears peeled.

Sarah and the Moose

Jun 12, 2017

What's your voice type? Alto? Soprano? Bass? Tenor?  Not sure?  Here's a primer to help you find your spot in the choir. (Click the post title if you don't see it, and enjoy.)

The daily 6:40 a.m. Mystery Piece (June 12 - 16) will test how well you can identify singers' voices.

Thanks to the Classical 91.5 listener to who sent in this comic relief! ~ Brenda

When Classical 91.5 listener Bruce Leslie attended a university graduation ceremony in London, he expected to hear Edward Elgar’s first “Pomp and Circumstance” march.   But he didn’t.  When he asked people about its omission, they looked at him incredulously and said that music had no connection with graduation in the U.K.

Caitlin Ochs for The New York Times

An emotional crowd cheered soprano Renée Fleming on Saturday after her final performance as the Marschallin in Richard Strauss’s “Der Rosenkavalier.”

“I’m thrilled to be leaving her on a high note with this phenomenal cast and gorgeous, smart new production," she said.  "I wouldn’t mind stopping the clocks for a moment or two today.”

See video and read more here.

Garden Delights

May 9, 2017
Brenda Tremblay

After the snow melts and the mud subsides, Rochester’s public gardens will take your breath away!  Here are some of my favorite gardens and music for your strolling pleasure.

Gabriella Pulsinelli

This Saturday (April 8th), University of Rochester students will kick off ArtAwake, an annual art and music festival.  But this year, festival organizers faced an unexpected challenge, as Nina Listro explains in this audio report.

Click here for more about ArtAwake and a list of events.

The idea is to reach an audience that's usually out of reach.

Migos’ rap song “Deadz” includes an all-black orchestra.

"The orchestra’s appearance in the video signifies opulence, and Orchestra Noir says their participation is a way to reach young African-Americans, an audience who may not routinely frequent orchestra concert halls."

Read more here.

Photo by Benjamin Chappell (New York)

David Chin serves as the Artistic Director of the Hong Kong Bach Festival, Malaysia Bach Festival, and the East Malaysia Bach Cantata Singers and Orchestra, as well as the Principal Conductor of the Association of Toronto Chinese Evangelical Church Musicians in Canada.  In this conversation with WXXI's Brenda Tremblay, he describes the blooming appreciation for J.S. Bach in Malaysia and the teachers that first introduced him to Bach's sacred masterworks.

REX/Shutterstock

Award-winning writer and broadcaster Armando Iannucci traces his love of classical music from the moment, at the age of 11, he walked into his first musical appreciation lesson. When the needle of the record player thumped onto a scratchy recording of Holst's The Planets, he was in love.  "Then I heard sounds that excited me in a way that somehow the recordings of Deep Purple and King Crimson my brothers played never did."  Read more.

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