Classical 91.5

Brenda Tremblay

Classical Morning Host and Producer

Brenda Tremblay bolts out of bed every weekday morning at 4:00 a.m. to present classical music on Classical 91.5 FM, streaming at wxxi.org.   (The broadcast starts at 6:00 a.m. with birdsong, inspired by the BBC.)  She’s an NEA Fellow who’s interviewed musical luminaires such as Renée Fleming, Yo-Yo Ma, and Steve Reich.  She also produces and hosts the RPO radio concerts and other local productions, and works with the Center for Public Affairs to create arts and cultural coverage for all media services.  Her productions have earned three Gracies from the Association of Women in Radio and Television, many AP awards, and a national Gabriel Award. 

Away from the studio, Brenda serves as Music Director at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Brockport, New York.  She loves to sing.  She’s performed with choirs in Carnegie Hall, Westminster Abbey, and in the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing.  In Rochester, some of her best musical memories have been made with friends in the Rochester Oratorio Society and Madrigalia.

Brenda Tremblay

Wake up with the sounds of the kinds of birds you’d see at a winter feeder.  If you wake up early enough, you can test yourself on the daily mystery piece at 6:40.   This week, we’ll count down composers who banked the most money over the course of their careers, adjusted for inflation.   Hear classical music from the WXXI library, the latest NPR News, a new dimension from the Composer’s Datebook at 7:20 a.m. 

Monday, December 11

Michael DuPre

You'll want to spend time with this dear man.    He was an army medic during World War II in the Battle of the Bulge, and he's not just a wonderful storyteller.  He's moved thousands of people with his small, simple instrument of choice, the harmonica. 

Pete DuPre’ has been playing the harmonica since he was a child.  He's now 94.  He continues to tell his stories and to make the harmonica sing in churches, nursing homes, schools, at memorials, and for celebrations of all kinds.  

Mark Grube

It takes a village to eat all the leftovers.  That's according to an informal survey of WXXI hosts and friends.  Need fresh ideas for your holiday?  Taste and see. 

Fried Oysters

This recipe comes from awesome WXXI volunteer and singer Eric Logan.

Provided by artist

English classical pianist Paul Lewis will appear in Rochester Monday night at the Eastman School of Music.   He's playing music by three European composers: Haydn, Beethoven, and Brahms.


Bettmann Archive, via CorbisPhoto

"The heart of Frederic Chopin, pickled in a jar of alcohol and then encased in a stone pillar in Holy Cross Church in Warsaw, shows the Polish composer died from complications of tuberculosis, according to an early version of an article published by the American Journal of Medicine."

Violinist Wendy Toh and the Eastman School Symphony Orchestra give the world premiere performance of a violin concerto by Zoe Wang this Wednesday at 8pm in Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre.  We were able to catch up over email about the music and their other projects as graduate students at the Eastman School of Music.  Enjoy!

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. (neg. no. LC USZ 62 37938)

A new staging of Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s opera “The Mother of Us All” will celebrate female empowerment at the recently renovated Hudson Opera House (now Hudson Hall) in Hudson, N.Y.

Susan B. Anthony once lectured there in real life.  In the 1947 opera, the suffragist  meets a colorful cast of real and imaginary characters. 

Rider University

Westminster Choir College lives on a short list of the best institutions for choral arts education in the United States.  Yesterday, the entire faculty received layoff notices from Rider University via email. All of the professors were told they will no longer have jobs as of August 31, 2018. 

Read more here.

 

Brenda Tremblay

Jeanne Gray is a force of nature.

She glows with enthusiasm for lifelong music-making.

“When you’ve got senior citizens who are back doing level one solos and enjoying it, why not?”

Born on October 9, 1926 in Endicott, New York, this great-grandmother has witnessed and shaped music programs across New York State through decades of teaching in Corning, New York and in Webster Central Schools until her so-called "retirement" in 1962. 

provided

"When I started walking Porter, we went down to Mount Hope Cemetery where there were a lot of hills and great places to visit. It's at that point that I met a whole bunch of other dog people . . . Now, I think of all the connections, all the groups I'm playing in now all just because of walking a dog!"

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