Classical 91.5

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Brenda Tremblay

You don't have to journey far to view fascinating musical instruments on display.

In Alfred, this summer, for example, see and touch Vladimir Horowitz's own Steinway piano, #314503, now known simply as CD 503, on its tour throughout North America during Alfred University’s upcoming MostArts Festival, scheduled for July 8-14th.

Cue the Pomp and Circumstance march.    It’s graduation season!   Here come rows and rows of beautiful young humans in caps and gowns, prepared to face an uncertain future. 

I’ve been thinking about rites of passage a lot since my oldest, Beverly, will graduate from college this spring and my third and youngest, Gavin, is about to finish high school.   His next move?  He’ll study music in the fall.  He wants to teach, which both thrills and worries me.  But I’m a born worrier.

Creative Commons

Did we say thank you?  

Just look at this.

It's good news about Classical 91.5 listeners from Stuart Hencke, Deputy Director at Rochester Education Foundation, who writes:

"Such a blessing"

Mar 20, 2018
provided

This month I was stymied by the challenge to recall my earliest connection with classical music.....in the home, yes I suppose.  I recall Spike Jones (1940s!) and Broadway shows, and no specific classical stuff comes to mind.  When Brenda played the "Largo" from the New World Symphony, that hit the nerve, so here is a tribute to my music teacher in backwards, 1950s, James Island, South Carolina. 

I was in 4th and 5th grades.

Dream Season

Mar 2, 2018
Suzi Gorman

After my recent conversation on Connections with Evan Dawson talking to Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra's Music Director Ward Stare and CEO Curtis Long about the RPO’s 2018-2019 season, I started thinking, "What if I were in charge?  What would be my dream season for the RPO?"

Getty images

I love figure skating!  With the Winter Olympics on, here's your very basic guide to Western classical music AND some breathtaking spins, too.

Singing to Power

Jan 31, 2018
Leonardo da Vinci

“Don’t be born a woman if you want to have your own way.”  - Nannina de’ Medici

For some 15th century wealthy women, performing was a political duty.

Glenn McClure

We’re following the adventures of composer Glenn McClure, who journeyed to Antarctica in late 2016. During an epic journey funded by the National Science Foundation, the SUNY Geneseo and Eastman professor lived in a tent on an ice shelf and worked with scientists to collect data. He is now using that data as inspiration for new music.

Take a listen:

The composer writes:

Marsha Rivers

A memory:

I'm walking out of the school cafeteria - fifth or sixth grade - sunlight streams through the windows, the air heavy is with the smell of goulash and green beans from that day's lunch. My dad (who was the junior high band director) and the elementary music school teacher, Mr. Grammatico, stop me in the hall. My dad is holding an empty glass coke bottle.

“What’s this note?” my dad asks me.  He blows across the top of the coke bottle and produced a low hoot.

“A-flat,” I say automatically.

Olivia Lopez

Once upon a time, my lips nearly melted off my face.

Thanks to Julie Philipp, the Democrat and Chronicle's senior engagement editor, I had the chance to tell a story from my personal life as part of a collection of true, first-person tales centered on the role music can play in defining who we are and how we express ourselves. Click here for "My Brief and Spectacular One-Day Career as an Adult Bassoonist."  

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