Classical 91.5

Classical Blog

Water Musics

Oct 5, 2017

  WXXI is hosting open house events for both teachers and students this week - with lots of fun and educational activities - inspired by the program Splash and Bubbles, which  encourages children to explore the natural undersea world and features endearing and humorous characters on fun-filled adventure.

There will be lots of great activities and information on about caring for our waterways, understanding more about life under the water, and other connections to science, education, nature, and art in our community.  

Streams, fountains, rivers, the ocean, and other aquatic phenomena have fascinated classical composers for centuries. To go along with all the other ways of exploring and understanding this part of our environment, here are just a few examples of music inspired by water in its many forms.

Keystone-France/Getty Images

Your friends at WXXI are planning next year's Classical 91.5 Presents film screenings at the Little Theatre.

If you have a suggestion of a movie featuring a classical soundtrack, please zap it to  classical@wxxi.org or make a comment below.

A few months ago, I had what I thought was a brilliant idea for the series -- a mini Stravinsky film festival!

Courtesy of SUNY College at Brockport Foundation

On National Poetry Day, let's remember a strange legacy from twentieth century American poet E.E. Cummings. Through a bizarre set of circumstances, an important collection of paintings by Cummings now live in a tiny gallery in a small Upstate New York canal town. 

Are you surprised that Cummings was a painter?  Indeed.  In fact, he thought his artwork was better than his poetry.  For the story (albeit dated) behind the paintings, click here.

Video image from Variety.com

You may be troubled by images of athletes and musicians in silent protest. 

Two singers knelt after singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” at separate NFL games on Sunday.  Even many non-football fans are transfixed by the public debate over free speech in sports arenas.  (If you've missed the controversy, catch up here.)

Photo By imr.sv

Hey! Fringe Fest* is here. Snuck right up on me, even though I am playing in it this weekend. Here are a few things that caught my attention that I thought to share with you. 

Happy Birthday, Michael Haydn!

Sep 14, 2017

  That’s right, Michael Haydn.

What?! There were TWO HAYDNS who were revered composers in the late 18th century? So much talent in one family! (Must have had smart and encouraging parents.)

September 14 marks the 280th birthday of the composer Johann Michael Haydn (1737-1806).  Michael Haydn was a prolific composer of many different types of music, but best known for his fine sacred works written in Salzburg, which were widely distributed throughout Europe during his lifetime.  Despite his reputation as a first-rate composer, his fame quickly faded following his death, as the stars of the great Viennese Classical trinity of Joseph Haydn, W. A. Mozart, and Beethoven became brighter than all of their contemporaries.  

Part 1: Classical radio in the classroom

Part 2: Classical public media, beyond the radio

(Note: this is the final installment of Nine Ideas on How to Use Classical Public Media.)

What can classical public media do for music students, beyond the classroom?

Part 3 includes ways teachers can leverage the power of public media in the real world.

Part 1: Classical radio in the classroom

(Note: This is a continuation of last week's post on how music educators can use classical public media in their classrooms to enhance students' musical experiences.)

Is it radio? Streaming? Media?  Journalism?  Yes!

Classical radio goes beyond the old-fashioned wireless. Almost all of the classical public radio stations have a website where you can find playlists,  blogs, and arts news.

Brenda Tremblay

WXXI Classical 91.5 is thrilled to work with music teachers from the Rochester area and across New York State to support music education. Our Morning Drive host, Brenda Tremblay, gave a presentation at the New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) summer conference on how music educators can use the power of public radio in their classrooms to enhance their students’ musical experience. 

English novelist and philosopher Aldous Huxley once said, “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.” Sacred music is humanity’s ultimate effort to express what we cannot ever fully comprehend – beauty, wonder, happiness, peace.

The music Peter DuBois presents each week is listened to, sung, played, and loved on every continent, in almost every country on earth. It is an art that is marked by both great traditions and great changes. From Temple Psalmody to Gregorian chant, to Reformation and Revolution, to the 21st Century Church, sacred music has told the story of faith and spirituality through the centuries.

Pages